Tag Archives: Tarzan

My Thoughts on: Tarzan Escapes (1936)

The next Tarzan film I decided to see is Tarzan Escapes from 1936. Like Tarzan and His Mate, this film once again sees outside forces attempting to return Jane to civilization, this time in the form of her cousins Eric and Rita. These two mean well, but their actions sure do cause a lot of grief for Jane and Tarzan, especially when a certain revelation is made at the end of the film (but I’ll get to that in a little bit).

Tarzan Escapes has two primary conflicts: one centers on whether or not Jane will return to civilization to sign some financial papers that will help her cousins, and the other involves Captain Fry, a big game hunter who has nefarious designs on Tarzan. The latter plays out as exactly the way you think it will (Tarzan does get caught but it doesn’t last for long and revenge is exacted). The big heart wrenching element in this film comes when Jane has to explain to Tarzan why she needs to go away for a few months to help her cousins. The only part of it that Tarzan understands is that Jane is going away, and it clearly breaks his heart. It’s enough to make me want to cry, even though I’ve rewatched the scene several times by now. Weissmuller’s Tarzan is so in love with Jane, even a temporary separation feels like the end of the world.

But what really bugs me about all of this, as I mentioned earlier, is that none of it had to happen. You see, early in the film Eric and Rita make it plain that Jane needs to come with them to provide her signature on some documents. However, once the status quo has been restored, it comes out that Eric and Rita were lying through their teeth: Jane never needed to come with them, she could’ve just signed a paper in the jungle and that would’ve been that. Maybe I’m overthinking it, but this revelation makes me more than a little angry on Jane and Tarzan’s behalf. Essentially, Tarzan’s heart was ripped out and stomped on (when he thought Jane was leaving) for no reason.

And I can’t leave a review of Tarzan Escapes without talking about Captain Fry, or more specifically what happens to him at the end of the story. After racing to safety through a treacherous swamp, Tarzan turns and forces Fry to go back the way they just came. He doesn’t say much, but he doesn’t have to, after everything that’s happened, it’s clear that Tarzan consider’s Fry’s actions to be unforgivable and nobody, not even Jane, can convince him otherwise. It’s a spine-chilling moment and a reminder that Tarzan is not one to mess with, for any reason.

Tarzan Escapes is another enjoyable entry in the series of Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan films, and one that everyone should see if they get the chance.

Let me know what you think about Tarzan Escapes in the comments below and have a happy New Year!!

See also:

My Thoughts on: Tarzan the Ape Man (1932)

My Thoughts on: Tarzan and His Mate (1934)

Film Reviews

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My Thoughts on: Tarzan and His Mate (1934)

Some time ago I was very excited to finally get my hands on the first six Tarzan films starring Johnny Weissmuller. Having never seen any of these films before (but having heard about them since I was little), I decided to start with Tarzan and His Mate, the second Tarzan film starring Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan as Tarzan and Jane respectively. This is a direct sequel to Tarzan the Ape Man (1932), as it sees the return not only of Harry Holt (Neil Hamilton) as Jane’s would-be suitor, but also the return of the elephant graveyard that was being sought in the previous film. Like most, if not all of the Tarzan films I’ve seen to date, the plot is familiar: someone wants to plunder the treasures of Tarzan’s jungle and Tarzan does everything in his power to stop it while complications inevitably ensue.

As I’ve quickly discovered with these films, Tarzan and His Mate is pure adventure of the best kind. Even at its darkest point, it never feels like Tarzan or Jane are in serious danger, because even when they are you just can’t believe that anything bad is going to happen to them (mostly because Tarzan is bound to swing in to the rescue).

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One thing that delighted me about Tarzan and His Mate was learning that Jane had her own unique “Tarzan yell.” Of course I knew about Weissmuller’s yell, it’s been the template for all Tarzan yells for over 50 years (with The Legend of Tarzan admittedly being an exception), but I had no idea that Jane (and later Boy) had their own unique yells.

Johnny Weissmuller is, for obvious reasons, one of my favorite parts of this movie. While he’s nothing like his animated counterpart, and definitely not much like his literary predecessor (in terms of vocabulary), I have no trouble believing that Weissmuller is Tarzan. He just fits the role so well.

It was also really cool seeing Neil Hamilton star in something other than Batman. For years all I knew the actor for was his work as Commissioner Gordon in the Batman television series and I really liked his work in this film and the previous installment.

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Also, you can really tell that Tarzan and His Mate is a pre-Code film. Not only is Jane’s costume extremely revealing (there’s little left to the imagination), there’s also an underwater sequence where Jane (played by a body double) is completely naked! My eyes popped out when I saw that scene for the first time. I mean, I knew pre-Code films took risks like that, but I didn’t know they did that! I’m really glad the copy I have restored that scene, because I read that it was cut out of the film for the longest time.

If you want to start watching the Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan films, I highly recommend starting with Tarzan and His Mate. Let me know what you think about this film in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

My Thoughts on: Tarzan the Ape Man (1932)

My Thoughts on: Tarzan Escapes (1936)

Film Reviews

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Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

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Disturbing Disney #11: Clayton’s Death in Tarzan (1999)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

You know, it sure seems to me like a lot of “disturbing” moments in Disney films happen to coincide with a villain’s death.

Tarzan (1999) is considered to be the end of the 1st Disney Renaissance, and for this reason I think the film has become totally underrated. Which is really a shame because the animation is incredible, particularly the scenes where Tarzan is “surfing” through the trees. The (real) villain is pretty awesome too. For most of the film, the “enemy” has been presented as Kerchak, the leader of the gorilla troop that raised Tarzan, and the gorilla that should have been Tarzan’s foster father, as it is Kerchak’s mate Kaala that  took the young man in when he was a baby, but Kerchak could never bring himself to accept the human as his son. However, the actual villain of this story is the bloodthirsty and devious Clayton (Brian Blessed), who has hitherto been working as a bodyguard for the expedition of Professor Porter and Jane. But in reality, Clayton has come because he wants to capture the gorillas for the handsome price they will fetch back in England.

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Behold the villainous Clayton, even before he’s revealed he kind of looks like a villain already

At the last minute, Tarzan is able to thwart Clayton’s attempt to kidnap all of the gorillas, but Clayton is not giving up just yet. After fatally wounding Kerchak, Clayton chases Tarzan up into the trees, figuring that if he can get Tarzan out of the way, rounding the gorillas back up should be easy. But despite his injuries (Clayton shot him in the arm), Tarzan has a distinct advantage: he was raised in this jungle, he knows how to navigate the trees with his eyes closed, Clayton is like a fish out of water.

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Despite this, he continues to chase Tarzan until the latter is cornered against a tree trunk. But then Tarzan uses the jungle to his advantage, ensnaring Clayton’s limbs in a tangle of jungle vines (to his mounting fury). At this point, Clayton fully snaps and begins to furiously hack at the vines holding him up, and a single shot forewarns what is about to happen: as the vines are cut away, one loop slips up to tighten around Clayton’s neck.

The first time I saw this film in theaters, I didn’t realize what was going to happen, but my parents did. To this day I remember my mom gasping at the shot and wondering what she was reacting to. I realize now that Clayton has a particularly gruesome and disturbing death scene, one that is pretty graphic if you think it through.

 

As I’d said, Clayton is hacking away at the vines that are holding him up, not noticing one loop remains coiled around his neck. He is so frantic to get loose to kill Tarzan that he doesn’t notice there are fewer and fewer vines holding him up. Even Tarzan sees what is about to happen and tries to warn him, but Clayton doesn’t listen…and then it’s too late. Down to two vines (the one around his neck and the one his hand is clenching), Clayton hacks the wrong vine and begins to fall screaming, the vine still looped around his neck. This moment is terribly disturbing: not only is Clayton falling to his death, but he has enough time to know it and try desperately to avert the inevitable (see, as he falls, you can see Clayton’s hands trying to remove the loop before he runs out of slack). Maybe Tarzan could have saved himself, but Clayton is no Tarzan and in no time we see the vine go taught with an audible *SNAP* and then we see the shadowy profile of Clayton hanging by his neck…DEAD.

I’ll give Disney credit for one thing: at least they kept the actual moment of death off-screen and only showed Clayton’s dead body in silhouette. Still…watching a villain die via a broken neck is pretty disturbing, and thus it is here on the list of Disturbing Disney.

But I would like to know what YOU think of Clayton’s death; does it disturb you? Do you find it gruesome? Let me know in the comments below, I would love to hear about it.

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For more Disturbing Disney, see also:

Disturbing Disney #1: The Coachman in Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #2: The truth of Pleasure Island in Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #3: Escaping Monstro from Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #4: Dumbo loses his mother (1941)

Disturbing Disney #5 The death of Bambi’s Mother

Disturbing Disney #6: Faline vs. the dogs (1942)

Disturbing Disney #7: Cruella wants to do WHAT??

Disturbing Disney #8: The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met (from Make Mine Music, 1946)

Disturbing Disney #9: Dr. Facilier’s Fate (The Princess and the Frog, 2009)

Disturbing Disney #10: The rat in Lady and the Tramp (1955)

Disturbing Disney #12: The Bear from The Fox and the Hound (1981)

Disturbing Disney #13: “Smoking them out” in The Fox and the Hound (1981)

Disturbing Disney #14: The Salt Trap in The Jungle Book (1994)

Disturbing Disney #15: Night on Bald Mountain from Fantasia (1940)

Disturbing Disney #16: King Triton destroys Ariel’s grotto

Disturbing Disney #17: Ratigan becomes a monster in The Great Mouse Detective

Disturbing Disney #18: The Queen’s assignment for her Huntsman

Disturbing Disney #19: Cinderella’s dress is destroyed (1950)

Disturbing Disney #20: Quasimodo is crowned ‘King of Fools’ (1996)

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My Thoughts on: The Legend of Tarzan (2016) w/spoilers

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

 

*warning: there are full and almost complete spoilers for the film below, turn back now if you don’t want the film to be spoiled for you!!!

Although I am familiar with the story of Tarzan, the only film version I had seen prior to Saturday was Disney’s 1999 animated version. The Legend of Tarzan was my first time seeing a live-action version of the Tarzan story and I have to say, it was completely worth it!

First, I have to say that this is not quite the traditional version of the story because, when the film opens, Tarzan and Jane have been living in London for almost ten years. Tarzan has claimed his “human” identity of John Clayton, Earl of Greystoke, and has worked very hard to forget that he was ever Tarzan. He puts on a good front, but in the opening scene where we first see Tarzan, it was clear to me that the man was miserable. He seemed bored with everything, and was totally in denial about who he really was, on the inside.

That’s the big theme of this movie: accepting who you really are, not what society expects you to be. In this case, Tarzan/John Clayton is attempting to live up to the wishes of his late father, who, in a letter to his then-infant son, repeatedly expressed the point that “London is your home, not this place.”

Tarzan’s wife Jane (Margot Robbie) however, is not in denial and when an invitation to visit the African Congo is extended to Tarzan, Jane insists on coming along, as she wants to go “home” to where she grew up.

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Even here in England though, in the vast expanse of Greystoke manner, Tarzan shows subtle signs that he has not quite forgotten the jungle. For one, he still enjoys eating raw eggs. And for another, he is still shown to be quite comfortable climbing trees, as he effortlessly pulls himself up to a branch where Jane is sitting. Reluctantly, he agrees that Jane can come along with him. Accompanying them is Dr. George Williams, played brilliantly by Samuel L. Jackson. His role is clearly that of comic relief, and it absolutely works.

However, the invitation to visit the Congo is a trap. The entire story takes place at a time when Leopold of Belgium is seeking to strengthen his hold on the Congo as a colony. But he’s running out of money to pay his troops so he dispatches Captain Rom (Christoph Waltz) to find the legendary diamonds of Ophar, which he does. But the diamonds are guarded by the tribe led by Chief Mbonga, and he has reason to see Tarzan dead. So the two make a deal: if Rom brings Tarzan, Mbonga will let him have as many diamonds as he needs. So Tarzan is lured to Africa, accompanied by Jane, and while visiting the local tribe that once hosted Jane and her father, both are captured by Rom and his men. But before they can reach the boat, Tarzan manages to break free while Jane remains a prisoner.

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From this point on, the story revolves around Tarzan shedding his civilized skin and slowly working back to his jungle roots. It’s a fascinating process to watch, and one of my favorite parts of the movie. There are several fights along the way: fighting a train car full of soldiers, and fighting his former ape “brother” who grew up alongside him years ago. While it’s true that Jane spends most of this time as a captive, she is hardly a “damsel-in-distress.” She does what she can to undermine Rom’s progress toward Mbonga’s territory, but she’s limited because her friends from the tribe are being held hostage and will be killed if she makes too much trouble.

Eventually, the two groups (Tarzan and George and Rom, Jane and his men) converge where Mbonga is waiting and things come to a head, which is where my one real gripe comes in. Through a series of flashbacks that tell the story of Tarzan’s childhood in the jungle, we learn that Mbonga’s son killed Tarzan’s ape mother Kala during a rite of passage where the men of the tribe had to hunt gorillas. In revenge, Tarzan chased the young man down and killed him, leaving Mbonga to swear vengeance if he ever got his hands on Tarzan. Considering that a good part of the film revolves around this plot of vengeance, the actual fight between Tarzan and Mbonga…is kind of short. It almost felt anti-climactic, because the big action climax comes a little later. I wish they would have spent a little more time on the tension between Tarzan and Mbonga, but what follows makes up for it fairly well.

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Jane is still a prisoner of Rom, but the latter has his diamonds now and the mercenary army they will pay for is getting ready to land at the port. If they come ashore, the Congo will stand no chance against them. But Tarzan has a plan: using his lion and ape friends, he causes a huge wildebeest stampede that storms the port town and collapses most of the buildings. It reminded me very much of a series of events in the original Jungle Book stories where Mowgli commanded the elephants to “let the jungle in” at a particular village. Seeing the town overrun by the wild animals of Africa reminded me of that moment.

Jane is finally saved, but there’s still the matter of Rom to settle. If there’s one thing you don’t do, it’s mess with Tarzan’s wife, so you’ve known for most of the film that there’s no way Rom is getting out of this alive. While fighting on a sinking boat, there comes a moment when Rom seemingly has Tarzan finished, with a strangling cord around his neck. But Tarzan begins to make a strange sound, and Rom asks him what he’s doing. Being raised around the animals of the jungle, Tarzan is a master of mimicking various animal calls, particularly mating calls. And in this case, he’s using the mating call of the crocodile to summon crocodiles to the boat. Large hungry crocodiles plus a defenseless Rom…you do the math on how it ends for the villain.

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One year later, it’s revealed that Tarzan and Jane have stayed in the jungle, apparently making their home with the same tribe that Jane grew up with. Tarzan is with the men, waiting for something. At last, a commotion comes from the big hut where all the women are gathered and a tribeswoman comes out with a little bundle in her hands: Tarzan and Jane’s child! At the beginning of the story, Tarzan let it slip that he and Jane recently lost a child, whether it was a miscarriage or a young child that died from illness is never specified. Now that they are back “home”, the birth of their child cements that this is where they truly belong.

I’m not sure if there’s a hook for a sequel or not, but I wouldn’t mind if a sequel was made. Overall, this was a very enjoyable film. A handful of moments could’ve been built up more than they were, but I still recommend this film if you like action and adventure.

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Also, the musical score by Rupert Gregson-Williams is very well done. This composer is not familiar to me, but I will be sure to keep an eye out for his name in the future. The cinematography is absolutely gorgeous, with a lot of shooting done on location in Africa. The contrast between the drabness of Greystoke manor and the vivid life found in the jungle is striking.

Final Thoughts: The Legend of Tarzan is a really good movie, Alexander Skarsgard does great justice to the role and Margot Robbie absolutely slays her role as Jane. Christoph Waltz is very believable as the villainous Captain Rom (although for some reason he kept reminding me of Aidan Gillen, who plays “Littlefinger” on Game of Thrones).

Have you seen The Legend of Tarzan? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below.

*poster image is the property of Warner Bros. Pictures

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