Tag Archives: Marco Beltrami

Marco Beltrami talks 3:10 to Yuma (2007)

Marco Beltrami talks 3:10 to Yuma (2007)

The 2007 film 3:10 to Yuma is a remake of the 1957 film of the same name, and tells the story of impoverished rancher Dan Evans (Christian Bale), who agrees to transport wanted outlaw Ben Wade (Russell Crowe) to the train station so he can board the 3:10 train to Yuma Territorial Prison. This mission is far from simple as Wade’s gang is in hot pursuit of their leader and will kill to free him again.

Evans, on the other hand, is seeking the $200 he will earn for safely delivering Evans to the train because it will greatly help his family. It also comes out that he wants to restore some sense of honor to his life so his sons will have something positive to remember about their father when they’re grown.

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By the end of the story, Evans is the only one of Wade’s captors still alive and the outlaw has developed a modicum of respect for the rancher (though an outlaw, Wade does have his own principles and he respects those who also have a firm sense of principles). Evans gets Wade all the way to the train only to be fatally shot by Prince, one of Wade’s men (despite Wade’s order that Prince not shoot).

Disgusted at the loss of a good man, Wade steps off the train and executes his entire gang before cheerfully surrendering to the authorities (thus ensuring that Evan’s contract is fulfilled and Evans’ sons will receive the money). Though he’s on the train to prison, he whistles for his horse, which follows along, implying that he’ll be on the loose again before long.

As a general rule, I am not overly fond of remakes. However, this film is an enjoyable way to pass a few hours, and the score is well done. The interview provides a great insight into how Beltrami put the score together. Enjoy!

See also:

Marco Beltrami talks Blade II (2002)

Marco Beltrami and Marilyn Manson talk Resident Evil (2002)

Marco Beltrami talks Live Free or Die Hard (2007)

Marco Beltrami talks The Wolverine (2013)

Marco Beltrami talks World War Z (2013)

Film Composer Interviews A-H

Film Composer Interviews K-Z

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Marco Beltrami talks Live Free or Die Hard (2007)

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Marco Beltrami talks Live Free or Die Hard (2007)

I have a slight confession to make: I’ve never actually seen any of the Die Hard movies. I’ve heard of them yes, but actually sat down and watched? No. I do know they all star Bruce Willis, and as far as I know they’ve all done pretty well at the box office. I happened across this interview by Marco Beltrami, who composed the music for Live Free or Die Hard and I found myself entranced by his work.

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Beltrami mentions (and I did not know this) that the late Michael Kamen composed the music for the first three Die Hard films, and that he did his best to live up to Kamen’s musical legacy. What I love about this interview is the depth that Beltrami goes into. He actually describes (in brief) the recording process, so even if you don’t like Die Hard, you should still watch this interview because of the detail he goes into.

After all, it’s not every day you see an interview like this one. Enjoy! (I know you will)

See also:

Marco Beltrami talks Blade II (2002)

Marco Beltrami and Marilyn Manson talk Resident Evil (2002)

Marco Beltrami talks 3:10 to Yuma (2007)

Marco Beltrami talks The Wolverine (2013)

Marco Beltrami talks World War Z (2013)

My thoughts on: Live Free or Die Hard (2007)

Film Composer Interviews A-H

Film Composer Interviews K-Z

Become a patron of the blog at: patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook 🙂

Thoughts on Underworld: Evolution (2006)

Years before the cinematic world witnessed the rivalry between vampires and werewolves in the Twilight series (2008-2012), a war was already ongoing in the world of Underworld (2003) and Underworld: Evolution.

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Selene

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                                Michael Corvin

In both films, the story follows the vampire Selene (Kate Beckinsale) as she initially hunts down the Lycans (werewolves) that she believes killed her family. The truth however, is that it was a vampire named Viktor who actually killed her family AND turned her into a vampire, and discovering this truth forces Selene to go on the run. At the end of the first film, Selene is in the company of a man named Michael Corvin (Scott Speedman), a distant descendant of Alexander Corvinus (Derek Jacobi), the first immortal and the father of the progenitors of the vampire and lycan races.

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 Alexander Corvinus

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                                                                                       Markus

It is revealed that Michael Corvin is actually a hybrid, both vampire AND lycan (because he was bitten by a lycan named Lucian and later by Selene), but he initially rejects this, until he discovers he can no longer eat human food and is almost captured (again).

Meanwhile, the vampire progenitor Markus (Tony Curran) has re-awoken and is hell bent on finding his brother William (Brian Steele) the first lycan, who has been locked away in a secret prison for over 800 years. It turns out that Selene possesses part of the key to opening William’s prison, as her human father built the place before being murdered by Viktor.

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Markus and William reunited at last

Ultimately, Markus succeeds in obtaining the keys to his brother’s prison (killing his father in the process) and letting his brother loose. But before he dies, Alexander tells Selene to drink from his blood, giving her stronger healing abilities and making her much stronger than before. Michael is believed to be dead after Markus impaled him, but it turns out he was only regenerating and together Michael and Selene take on the two powerful brothers. After a vicious battle, both progenitors are killed and the world is saved. As the movie ends, Selene discovers that the sunlight no longer burns her skin (as it normally should for a vampire), raising the possibility of a whole new life she could spend together with Michael.

The score for this action-packed film was composed by Marco Beltrami (born 1966), a composer noted for his work in the horror genre (Mimic (1997), Resident Evil (2002), and The Woman in Black (2012)). Other notable scores include Blade II (2002), I, Robot (2004), World War Z (2013) and the remake of Ben-Hur (2016).

Unfortunately, movies like Underworld: Evolution often get overlooked because some feel that an action movie can’t possess a score worth noticing. While this is sometimes true (i.e. the score of Van Helsing in 2004), Underworld: Evolution does have a few themes that are worthy of mention. My favorite would have to be the final cue, called “The Future.” This is the moment when Selene holds her hand out to the sunlight and realizes that it doesn’t burn anymore.

Underworld: Evolution- The Future

Another cue of note is “Patricide” when Markus kills his father Alexander.

Underworld: Evolution- Patricide

If you haven’t seen the Underworld films before, I highly recommend the first two in the series (I admit I haven’t seen the one that came out in 2012). I hope you enjoyed this look at Underworld: Evolution!

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