Tag Archives: film music

Sleeping Beauty “Skumps” (1959)

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Sleeping Beauty “Skumps” (1959)

As we begin to reach the end of the film, we finally go back to the castle where King Stefan is impatiently waiting for the sun to set so he can finally see his daughter. King Hubert (Philip’s father) tries to cheer Stefan up by presenting him a bottle of wine that he has been saving for sixteen years. This leads to “Skumps” (also known as “The Drinking Song”), a jovial song performed by Hubert and Stefan as they toast Aurora’s imminent return and the fact that the marriage of their children will unite their kingdoms. Of course Hubert wants the wedding to happen right away but, as Stefan rightly points out “I haven’t even SEEN my daughter yet, and you’re trying to take her away from me!” (Maleficent delves a whole lot deeper into the question of what happens when you’re not actually raised by your parents and then reintroduced to them)

Skumps! Skumps!

Skumps!

A toast to this night!

The outlook is rosy,

But the future is bright,

Our children will marry, Our kingdoms unite, Skumps! Skumps! Skumps!

Skumps!

Skumps!

A toast to the home!

One grander by far than a palace in Rome!

Ah, let me fill up your glass, That glass was all foam!

Skumps! Skumps! Skumps!

It’s an amusing song meant to brighten the mood before the drama that will follow. And despite the lighthearted tone, things nearly break down between Hubert and Stefan. When the latter attempts to break it to his fellow monarch that the revelation about Philip might come as a shock to Aurora, Hubert takes it wrong and things nearly break down into warfare between the two (Hubert attacks Stefan using a fish as a sword) before the pair realize how ridiculous they’re being and dissolve into laughter. The two kings are sure that Philip and Aurora will love each other, but boy does Philip have news for his father.

I like to call this part of the film “The Comedy of Errors” because of all the misunderstandings that occur in short order. It can be summed up like this:

1) King Hubert thinks his son Prince Philip is in love with a peasant girl
2) The fairies think Aurora is in love with a commoner
3) Neither side realizes they’ve actually met Aurora/Prince Philip (though admittedly Hubert does think this initially)
4) And most importantly, Maleficent is wise to the fairy’s scheme and nobody knows it.

Based on all of these misunderstandings, Aurora is miserable while being led back to the castle, Philip has left to seek the girl he loves and Hubert is in a quandary about how to tell Stefan that Philip doesn’t want to marry Aurora anymore.

Let me know what you think about “Skumps” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Sleeping Beauty “Hail to the Princess Aurora” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “The Gifts of Beauty and Song” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “I Wonder” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “Once Upon A Dream” (1959)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

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Sleeping Beauty “Once Upon A Dream” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty Part 2

Sleeping Beauty “Once Upon a Dream” (1959)

Like many sixteen year old girls, Aurora wants very much to be in love, in fact she claims to have met her true love already….just in her dreams though. She seems so depressed that he isn’t real that the animals decide to do something to cheer her up. It just so happens that Prince Philip is still nearby, drying off after Samson accidentally dunks him into the river. The animals sneak off with his hat, cloak and boots and dress up the owl as her “dream prince” (much to Aurora’s amusement). This leads to the first rendition of “Once Upon a Dream” (taken directly from Tchaikovsky’s “Sleeping Beauty Waltz.”)

I know you, I walked with you once upon a dream
I know you, the gleam in your eyes is so familiar a gleam
Yet I know it’s true that visions are seldom all they seem
But if I know you,
I know what you’ll do
You’ll love me at once
The way you did once upon a dream

The song is simple: Aurora and Philip are in love because they’ve already met in their dreams (a funny premise for a relationship, but this is Disney after all). While Aurora and the animals are having their fun, Philip and Samson finally lay eyes on the mysterious singer and of course Philip falls in love at first sight. So what does the prince do? Join in the song of course! The prince and princess share a dance and then at the crucial moment when Philip asks her name, it’s only THEN that Aurora remembers that she’s not supposed to speak to strangers and runs off. Meanwhile, back at the cottage…things are going…well….not well actually.

Sleeping Beauty Part 2

After enduring Flora’s efforts at dressmaking and watching Fauna attempt to make a cake, Merriweather finally snaps and lets the others know that if they’re going to do this properly they just need to use magic. Soon enough the cake is nearly ready, the cottage is clean and the dress is almost done. There’s just one little snag…shall the dress be pink or blue? (On a side note: the running gag of changing the dress’s color stems from a real-life argument the animators had over the very same question. They simply could not agree on whether the dress should be pink or blue so they ended up doing both…in a way.)

Sleeping Beauty Part 2

Flora and Merriweather get into a full-blown fight over the color of the dress, leading to magical sparks flying all over the cottage and straight up the chimney (the one part of the house they forgot to close up. Of course, the magical fight draws the attention of Maleficent’s raven Diablo, who has been searching far and wide for the missing Aurora ever since her other minions revealed that they’ve been searching for a baby for sixteen years! Diablo peeks his head in and witnesses Aurora coming home to tell her aunts about the wonderful man she’s just met, only to hear some rather earth-shattering news (one, her name is Aurora and not Briar Rose. Two, she’s a princess and she’s going back to the royal castle tonight and three, she must NEVER see that young man again (because of course the fairies have no way of knowing who he is.))

This news delights Diablo and he rushes off to inform his mistress while Aurora, quite naturally, has an emotional breakdown. This leads to one of the most ridiculous lines I have ever heard. Merriweather turns to the others and says “And we thought she’d be so happy…” I’m sorry but, how would YOU react if everything you’d ever known your whole life turned out to be a lie? I don’t think I would be happy about it personally (but that’s just me.) And remember when I said that Aurora speaks the least out of any Disney Princess? Once Aurora runs upstairs and throws herself on the bed…she doesn’t speak again for the rest of the movie.

Let me know what you think about “Once Upon A Dream” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Sleeping Beauty “Hail to the Princess Aurora” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “The Gifts of Beauty and Song” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “I Wonder” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “Skumps” (1959)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Sleeping Beauty “I Wonder” (1959)

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The prologue of the film being over, the story flashes forward to Aurora’s sixteenth birthday, though in the story she has been raised under the name Briar Rose by her three “aunts.” The teenage princess is voiced by opera singer Mary Costa, who also stood in as the physical model for Aurora. Being an opera singer, Aurora’s singing style is something of a call back to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Costa is a true soprano (as her vocal improvisation at the beginning of “I Wonder” makes perfectly clear.) On this day, her “aunts” Flora, Fauna and Merriweather need Briar Rose out of the house so that they can make a few surprises for her birthday, so the teenager is shooed out of the house to pick some berries. After Briar Rose leaves, it becomes obvious that the fairies have set a huge (read: impossible) task for themselves. According to Merriweather, Flora “can’t sew” and Fauna “has never cooked.” (Which really makes one wonder who’s been keeping the household running all these years.) Nevertheless, the fairies set out on their task and we’re soon following Briar Rose out into the forest.

Of all the Disney Princesses, Aurora speaks the least, and this scene in the forest marks the opening of her first song, “I Wonder.” In this song, Aurora/Briar Rose summons her animal friends by improvising a clear soprano melody.

Sleeping Beauty Part 2

It is during this vocal introduction that we also meet the grown up Prince Philip. The prince has no idea that his betrothed is close by, so naturally he’s curious to see the source of this gorgeous melody. This leads to a hysterical moment where Philip spurs his horse on by promising him extra carrots if he’ll help him look for the singer. The excited horse charges off, only to stop short as he accidentally flings Philip into a creek (the disgruntled prince revokes his offer of carrots). As they attempt to find the singer, we go back to Aurora’s song.

I wonder, I wonder,
I wonder why each little bird has a someone
To sing to, sweet things to,
A gay little love melody
I wonder, I wonder,
I wonder if my heart keeps singing,
Will my song go winging
To someone, who’ll find me
And bring back a love song to me.

As her friends gather, the princess muses aloud about why all the animals around her have their own loved ones, but not her. She then wonders, if she keeps singing, maybe she’ll find a lover of her own (ironically the song concludes with Aurora looking wistfully at the royal castle in the distance, not knowing that she’s looking at her birthplace and rightful home.) It would seem that at sixteen years old, Aurora feels somewhat…smothered…by her well-meaning aunts who “still treat her like a child.”

Having grown up knowing no one but her three aunts, Aurora/Briar Rose is understandably feeling lonely and sad because there isn’t anyone new for her to talk to or meet. She has no idea that her entire life is about to be turned upside down in a matter of hours. I really like “I Wonder,” it’s a beautiful, operatic song that reveals in short order the kind of woman Aurora is growing up to be (clearly the gifts of Beauty and Song have done their work). The only thing that disappoints me is that Aurora doesn’t talk more throughout the film.

Let me know what you think about “I Wonder” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Sleeping Beauty “Hail to the Princess Aurora” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “The Gifts of Beauty and Song” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “Once Upon A Dream” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “Skumps” (1959)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Sleeping Beauty “Hail to the Princess Aurora” (1959)

Evolution of Disney : Sleeping Beauty Part 1

Sleeping Beauty “Hail to the Princess Aurora” (1959)

After the success of Cinderella, nine long years passed before Sleeping Beauty came to the theater. It wasn’t supposed to be that long of a wait, but the production (as many Disney animated features tended to do) ran over-budget and became the most expensive Disney film to date when it was finally finished. Unlike the previous two Disney Princess films, the score to Sleeping Beauty was derived entirely from the music Tchaikovksy wrote for his Sleeping Beauty ballet. The only original item is the lyrics added to the songs (as well as a simplified arrangement of the melody).

After an introduction by an unseen narrator that explains the circumstances of Princess Aurora’s birth, the film opens with the song “Hail to the Princess Aurora,” ostensibly sung by all the nobles journeying to the castle to see the newborn Princess. This was the first Disney movie to be animated in a widescreen format and the animators took full advantage of the extra space given to them.

Joyfully now to our princess we come,
Bringing gifts and all good wishes, too,
We pledge our loyalty anew

Hail to the Princess Aurora!
All of her subjects adore her!

Hail to the King!
Hail to the Queen!
Hail to the Princess Aurora!

Health to the Princess,
Wealth to the Princess,
Long live the Princess Aurora!

Hail Aurora!
Hail Aurora!
Health to the Princess,
Wealth to the Princess,
Long live the Princess Aurora!

Hail to the King!
Hail to the Queen!
Hail to the Princess Aurora!

“Hail to the Princess Aurora” is a rich choral piece that takes the audience from the town all the way up to the castle where the King and Queen are receiving their guests. Everything is animated in gorgeous colors and this remains one of my favorite openings to a classic Disney film. Let me now what you think about “Hail to the Princess Aurora” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Sleeping Beauty “The Gifts of Beauty and Song” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “I Wonder” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “Once Upon A Dream” (1959)

Sleeping Beauty “Skumps” (1959)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Cinderella “So This is Love” (1950)

Cinderella Part 2

Cinderella “So This is Love” (1950)

In her new carriage, Cinderella finally arrives at the castle where the ball is already underway. The Prince stands at the head of a receiving line where every single maiden is being presented to him. Cinderella (in her sparkling Christian Dior-inspired dress) arrives and attracts the attention of everyone, particularly the Prince, who brushes right by Cinderella’s stepsisters and asks her for a dance. This leads to “So This is Love” also known as “The Cinderella Waltz.” Unlike Snow White’s songs, Cinderella isn’t exactly singing while she dances, the words reflect her thoughts as she dances with the man of her dreams. While this love scene goes on, several things happen at once. The King orders the Grand Duke to give the couple some privacy (as he is desperate to see his son married) and Lady Tremaine becomes suspicious about who this mysterious young lady is. But before she can get a closer look, the Grand Duke shuts the curtain and doesn’t let her get any closer to the pair.

Mmmmmm, Mmmmmm
So this is love, mmmmmm
So this is love
So this is what makes life divine
I’m all aglow, mmmmmm
And now I know

And now I know

The key to all heaven is mine

My heart has wings, mmmmmm
and I can fly

I’ll touch every star in the sky
So this is the miracle that I’ve been dreaming of

So this is love

In terms of tone (and placement in the film), “So This is Love” is Cinderella’s equivalent to “Someday My Prince Will Come.” Both are waltzes, and both come not long before the climax of the story. The song ends and the couple is clearly in love, but just as things are getting interesting, the clock begins to strike midnight! This is the part that always confused me. If they are truly in love (and the Prince may marry any eligible maiden he chooses), what does it matter if the spell breaks and Cinderella’s dress goes away?

The original concept for “So This is Love” involved Cinderella and the Prince appearing to dance in the clouds (a concept that eventually reappeared at the end of Sleeping Beauty). There was supposed to be a different song as well for this sequence, titled “Dancing on a Cloud,” the lyrics of which survive:

Dancing on a cloud
I’m dancing on a cloud
When I’m in your arms the world is a heavenly place

Dancing in a dream
I’m dancing in a dream
For how can I help but dream when I see your face
before me

 Love is on its way
And as we gently sway
The moon and the stars appear bringing romance
for two

I just can’t believe that I found you
I just can’t believe that it’s true
Yet here am I dancing high on a cloud with you
Dancing on a cloud, I’m dancing on a cloud

While the lyrics are different, the sentiments expressed in “So This is Love” are still present, Cinderella and the Prince are completely in love at first sight and they want this moment to last forever. Let me know what you think about “So This is Love” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

 

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

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Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

After having her dress destroyed, poor Cinderella has finally reached her breaking point and just when she is on the verge of giving up, *POOF* here is her Fairy Godmother! And with the power of magic, Cinderella will be able to go to the ball after all! The Fairy Godmother was voiced by Verna Felton, who played a number of roles in Disney films during her career, including the Queen of Hearts, Aunt Sarah (in Lady and the Tramp), Flora in Sleeping Beauty, and Winifred the elephant in The Jungle Book (a posthumous role as she passed away before the film was released).

Listening to this song brings back all the good memories of childhood. The melody practically bounces from one note to the next, this is because the primary melody is a string of triplets (groups of three notes, see the number three under or above each group, that signifies a triplet.) Also, it’s really fun to try and say the nonsense words! During the song, some of Cinderella’s mice friends become horses, while her dog and horse become a coachman and a footman.

Salago-doola
Menchicka boola
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo
Put ’em together
And what have you got?
Bibbidi-bobbidi-Boo

Salago-doola
Menchicka boola
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo
It’ll do magic
Believe it or not
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo

Now salago-doola means
Menchicka boole-roo
But the thingmabob
That does the job
Is bibbidi-bobbidi-boo

Oh…

Salago-doola
Menchicka boola
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo
Put ’em together
And what have you got?
Bibbidi-bobbidi…
Bibbidi-bobbidi…
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo

While all of this looks lovely, there’s still the matter of Cinderella’s dress, which the Fairy Godmother almost forgets. Allegedly, Walt Disney’s favorite piece of animation is the moment Cinderella receives her ball gown (which was always one of my favorites as well). Of course, with any bit of magic, there is always a catch: the spell that created her carriage, her dress and everything else, will break at the last stroke of midnight “and all will be as it was before.” Essentially, the Fairy Godmother is giving Cinderella her one chance to make her dreams come true, so she needs to make the most of it. That being said, I always wondered why Cinderella had to leave before the spell broke, surely if the Prince really loved her she could tell him the truth (I’m probably missing the point, I know).

As I’ve gotten older, I can’t help but notice the irony in this situation. If Lady Tremaine had let Cinderella come to the ball in her homemade dress, it’s possible the Prince would’ve never noticed her in the first place. But because she had to be spiteful, Cinderella receives a magical gown that guarantees she will be noticed.

Let me know what you think about “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

Cinderella “So This is Love” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

 

Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

Cinderella247

Cinderella “The Work Song” (1950)

The message Cinderella gets at the end of “Sing Sweet Nightingale” is the one announcing a royal ball where “every eligible maiden is to attend” so that the Prince may select a bride. This does include Cinderella and Lady Tremaine knows that perfectly well. However, as she herself says, “IF Cinderella can finish all the chores, get her sisters ready AND have a suitable dress to wear, THEN she may indeed come with them.” The key word in that entire sentence, is IF (as a kid it took me years to understand that Lady Tremaine never intended for Cinderella to come with them at all).

The mice and birds, hearing the stepsisters and Lady Tremaine keeping Cinderella busy by running all over the house, are furious and decide to work on her mother’s dress so that she can go to the ball in spite of her stepfamily. This leads to “The Work Song.” I personally love this song, especially the opening part where Jaq is imitating the nagging voices of the family.

“Poor Cinderelly. Every time she find a minute, that’s the time that they begin it! Cinderelly! Cinderelly!”
“CINDERELLLLLLA!!!” (Jaq kicks the door shut in disgust)

Cinderelly Cinderelly
Night and day it’s Cinderelly
Make the fire!
Fix the breakfast!
Wash the dishes!
Do the mopping!
And the sweeping and the dusting!
They always keep her hopping!
She go around in circles till she very, very dizzy
Still they holler…
keep-a busy Cinderelly!

“Yeah, keep-a busy. You know what? Cinderelly’s not goin to the ball.”
“What?”
“Not goin?”
“What did you say?”
“You see. They fix her. Work, work, work. She’ll never get her dress done.”
“P-P-P-Poor Cinderelly.”

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“Hey! We can do it!”
We can do it, we can do it,
We can help-a Cinderelly
We can make a dress so pretty
There’s nothing to it really.
We’ll tie a sash around it
Pull a ribbon through it
When dancing at the ball
She’ll be more beautiful than all
In the lovely dress we’ll make for Cinderelly

Hurry, hurry, hurry, hurry
Gotta help-a Cinderelly
Got no time to dilly dally
We gotta get-a going

I’ll cut it with these scissors
And I can do the sewing
Leave the sewing to the women
You go get some trimming
And we’ll make a lovely dress for Cinderelly
Yes, we’ll make a lovely dress for Cinderelly!

Of course, to finish the dress on time, the mice end up…borrowing…a few things that Anastasia and Drizella threw away (particularly a necklace and a sash (the ribbon that ties around the waist). You can’t blame the mice for taking them since the two sisters clearly don’t want these items (deriding them as “worthless” and “trash.”) However, you also have to know that incorporating some of her stepsister’s belongings into the dress practically guarantees that this isn’t going to end well for Cinderella (even though she knows nothing about it). Despite knowing the fate of this dress, it’s still fun to watch the mice and birds come together to make a nice dress for Cinderella.

Let me know what you think about “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

Cinderella “So This is Love” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook