Tag Archives: Bugs Bunny

Reviewing Looney Tunes: Bugs’ Bonnets (1956)

Bugs-Bonnets

Released: January 14th, 1956

Directed by: Chuck Jones

Bugs’ Bonnets is a cartoon that isn’t as well known as some of the other Jones classics (like the Rabbit Season trilogy for example), but it is still a great cartoon in my opinion. The scenario for this cartoon is half-story (Elmer hunting Bugs) and half-documentary (looking at how different hats can change your personality). Since this is a cartoon, the hats instantly change Elmer and Bugs’ personalities, with hilarious results. One interesting piece of trivia: in this cartoon Elmer suddenly knows how to pronounce his “R’s” correctly. My favorite examples in this cartoon include:

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-Bugs wears an Army sergeant’s helmet and gives Elmer a chewing out (“Alright dog face, how come every other private in this man’s army’s got a rifle and YOU’VE got a gun?”) In response, Elmer ends up wearing a hat reminiscent of General MacArthur, announcing “I have returned.”

-Bugs (in a game warden’s hat) chides Elmer for “shooting sergeants out of season.”

-Elmer (in a cop’s hat) threatens Bugs (in a “gangster” fedora) while the latter tries to buy Elmer off with a bribe. Before he can give the money back, Bugs’ hat is replaced with a judge’s wig, prompting Bugs to believe Elmer is trying to bribe HIM!

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While this cartoon is more a string of gags than anything else, that doesn’t stop it from being really funny. What do you think of Bugs’ Bonnets? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Reviewing Looney Tunes

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Reviewing Looney Tunes: Bully for Bugs (1953)

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Released August 8th, 1953

Directed by: Chuck Jones

Half of the reason I love Bully for Bugs so much is the crazy story behind how it got made in the first place. According to the late, great Chuck Jones, the idea came to him when producer Eddie Selzer, out of the blue, came to his work area and proclaimed “cartoons about bullfighting are NOT funny, so don’t make any!” Upon Selzer leaving to go back to his office, a bewildered Jones turned to his fellow animator and wondered aloud “WOULD a bullfighting cartoon be funny?” The funny thing is, according to Jones, since Selzer proved to be wrong on just about anything involving cartoons, they figured a bullfighting cartoon would actually be hilarious. So, to get some research done (as nobody in the department had ever seen a bullfight in person), Jones flew down to Mexico City to watch a bullfight for himself.

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Up until the fight started, Jones had the idea that the matador would be the villain of the story, while the bull would be the sympathetic character. This notion flew straight out the window when Jones saw a massive bull come charging into the arena to face off against this itty bitty matador who was maybe 100 lbs soaking wet. From that moment, Jones knew exactly how the story needed to play out. (The story comes from Jones’ autobiography Chuck Amuck and commentary for Bully for Bugs found in the Looney Tunes Golden Collection).

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This cartoon is another example of Bugs taking a wrong turn at Albuquerque and winding up in the middle of a bullfighting ring instead of the Coachella Valley Carrot Festival. In the ring, a hapless matador is being chased around by a huge bull (much to the displeasure of the crowd. And speaking of the crowd, that’s a real bullfighting crowd you’re hearing in the cartoon, they recorded some audio in Barcelona, Spain and looped it into the final product). Being oblivious to the fact that he’s way off target, Bugs ends up on the wrong side of the bull, who promptly knocks him clean out of the arena (inspiring Bugs to proclaim “Of course you realize THIS means war!”) The enraged rabbit returns as a matador to give the bull his comeuppance as only Bugs can deliver it. For a while it’s an even back and forth between the two (and one of Bugs’ tricks actually backfires on him in spectacular fashion). Finally, just when Bugs seems cornered, he gets the upper hand and eliminates the bull once and for all by building an elaborate trap that sets the bull up to encounter some TNT.

Bully for Bugs is another classic Chuck Jones cartoon that never gets old no matter how many times you watch it. Let me know what you think about this cartoon in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Reviewing Looney Tunes

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook 🙂

Reviewing Looney Tunes: Ali Baba Bunny (1957)

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Released: February 9th, 1957

Directed by: Chuck Jones

Of the many achievements Chuck Jones accomplished during his lengthy career, one of them was raising the pairing of Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck into a comedic art form that has yet to be truly matched in animation. Ali Baba Bunny is a famous example of this pairing and one of my many personal favorite cartoons.

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In Ali Baba Bunny, Bugs and Daffy are en route to Pismo Beach (California) and somehow end up tunneling through the Arabian desert, where a wealthy sultan has just finished sealing his treasure inside a magic cave. Having set the burly Hassan to guard the treasure (“Or the jackal shall grow fat on thy carcass!”) the sultan departs, shortly before Bugs and Daffy unwittingly break into the cave by tunneling under the entrance. This cartoon features Daffy during his “greedy beyond all reason” phase and it is used to great comedic effect. For example, when the pair emerge from the burrow and realize this is NOT Pismo Beach, Daffy is almost instantly mesmerized by the giant pile of treasure in front of him, while Bugs is completely oblivious. This leads to one of my favorite Daffy Duck lines:

Daffy: It’s mine you understand? Mine, mine, ALL MINE! Get back in there! Down! Down! Down! Go! Go! Go! Mine! Mine! Mine! Mwahahahahahahaha!! *zooms off to the treasure*

Bugs (still oblivious): Ehhhhh, what’s up Duck?

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Only Bugs would be oblivious to all THIS

Of course there is the small matter of Hassan who is quite angry that someone is trying to take his master’s treasure. Despite Bugs’ best efforts to keep Daffy out of trouble (which include masquerading as a genie who “gives” Hassan the treasure for HIS own), Daffy keeps getting on the guard’s bad side, especially when he makes a run for it with a giant diamond! This leads Bugs to finally corner Daffy and demand to know (“What is it with you anyway?” to which Daffy replies “I can’t help it, I’m a greedy slob, it’s my hobby.”) This is probably one of the most honest answers Daffy has ever given regarding his greed (a fit of honesty likely brought on by the fact that Hassan wants to chop him to pieces).

I also love this cartoon because it has one of the greatest twist endings ever seen in a cartoon: Daffy appears to have it made. Hassan is gone, the treasure is loaded up ready to go, when the greedy duck finds a mysterious lamp in the back of the cave. For some reason, when a genie appears (and even calls Daffy “Master”!!) The duck explodes with rage and accuses the genie of wanting his treasure. This is why I say Daffy is greedy beyond all reason, because wouldn’t you think the duck would be happy to have a magic genie at his disposal? I suppose not, and boy does the duck pay for it!

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“I’m rich! I’m a happy miser!”

Ali Baba Bunny, as I’ve said before, is one of my favorite Chuck Jones cartoons, and I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about it. Let me know what you think about this cartoon in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Reviewing Looney Tunes

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook 🙂

Reviewing Looney Tunes: Broom-Stick Bunny (1956)

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Released February 25th, 1956

Directed by: Chuck Jones

Broom-Stick Bunny has long been one of my favorite Looney Tunes cartoons, as it features the debut of June Foray in the role of Witch Hazel (Bea Benaderet performed the voice in Hazel’s first appearance in Bewitched Bunny). This is actually Foray’s second time playing a character by this name (with this voice no less) as she originated the character in the 1952 Donald Duck cartoon Trick or Treat (and in truth she was initially reluctant when Chuck Jones invited her to play his version of Witch Hazel, but she eventually came around to the idea).

In this cartoon, it’s Halloween night and Bugs Bunny is out trick-or-treating disguised as a witch (complete with a green mask). Meanwhile, Witch Hazel is brewing up a potion while frequently consulting her magic mirror to make sure she’s still the “ugliest of them all” as she’s terribly afraid of getting pretty as she gets older. One of my favorite running gags in this cartoon is Witch Hazel’s obsession with ugliness and talking about beauty in opposite terms (examples include: “Who undoes your hair?” “I’m going to worm all your ugly secrets out of you” and my personal favorite “LIKE it? Why it’s practically HIDEOUS!!”)

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The story starts as a comedy of errors when Bugs Bunny appears at Witch Hazel’s door and the befuddled witch thinks the rabbit is a REAL witch (leading to my other favorite line: “Witch? I don’t remember seeing HER at any of the union meetings.”) but it quickly turns serious when Hazel realizes that not only is Bugs a rabbit, but he’s also the last ingredient needed to complete her potion, leading to a wild chase throughout the house.

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In the end, of course, Bugs gets the upper hand and we’re treated to seeing what a pretty Witch Hazel looks like (fun fact: according June Foray’s commentary, the animators modeled the pretty Hazel on her actual appearance, particularly in the hairstyle as it was one she liked to wear at the time). It’s so funny to hear the now-pretty witch say in the sweetest sounding voice “Magic mirror on the wall, who’s the ugliest one of all?” The gag is heightened when the genie in the magic mirror gives chase on a flying carpet and the pair go flying off into the night.

Of all the Witch Hazel cartoons, Broom-Stick Bunny remains my favorite, and I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about it. Let me know your thoughts about this cartoon in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Reviewing Looney Tunes

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook 🙂