Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Fox and the Hound “Lack of Education” (1981)

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Unfortunately, I end up saying this about a lot of older Disney films, but The Fox and the Hound is yet another example of a Disney film that is all but forgotten. Loosely based on Daniel Mannix’s 1967 book of the same name, The Fox and the Hound follow a young fox named Tod (Keith Mitchell/Mickey Rooney) and a bloodhound pup named Copper (Corey Feldman/Kurt Russell) as they strike up an unlikely friendship. Tod’s other friends, including an owl named Big Mama (Pearl Bailey), attempt to convince Tod that being friends with a bloodhound (especially when you’re a fox) can only lead to trouble. This is the point of “Lack of Education” where Big Mama and the rest of Tod’s friends attempt to spell things out for the young fox: that if he continues trying to be friends with Copper he’s going to wind up dead.

You listen good Tod, because it’s either education or elimination!

Now, if you’re so foxy and old Chief is so dumb
Then why does that hound get the fox on the run?
‘Cause he’s got the hunter –
and the hunter’s got the gun
Ka-blam, elimination!
Lack of education!

If you pal around with that Copper hound
You’ll wind up hanging on the wall
Keep you nose to the wind –
and you keep your skin
‘Cause you won’t be home –
when the hunter comes to call

Oh, Big Mama, I know Copper would never track me down.
Well, Copper, he’s my best friend.

Ho ho, your best friend!

Now, Copper’s gonna do what he’s been told.
Suppose he won’t chase no fox in no fox hole?
Along comes the hunter with a buck shot load.

Ka-ka-blam!

Elimination.

Lack of education!

Tod seemingly makes a good point when he says Copper would never track his best friend down, but while this is true now, Big Mama knows all too well that with enough time and training, Copper will hunt anything down. She doesn’t want to upset the young fox, but in her mind it’s better if he’s made aware of the facts of life now. Of course, this being a Disney film, Tod doesn’t take the lesson to heart and tries to maintain his friendship with Copper, with increasingly disastrous consequences.

Unlike many Disney songs, “Lack of Education” is performed in more of a “speak-sing” style (meaning the performers are half-talking and half-singing) and Tod doesn’t sing at all. It’s a short, blunt moment that goes completely over Tod’s head, which makes sense, after all who wants to believe their newfound best friend will one day hunt them down and kill them?

I hope you enjoyed this look at an underrated Disney classic. Let me know what you think about “Lack of Education” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

The Fox and the Hound “A Hunting Man” (1981)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

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My Thoughts on: Frozen (2013)

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Six years after the fact, I finally managed to watch Disney’s Frozen, loosely based on The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Anderson. And, this should surprise nobody, I loved it. The story is set in the kingdom of Arendelle and follows the two princesses Elsa (Idina Menzel) and Anna. Elsa (for reasons never explained) is born with ice powers that she fights to control as she grows up. It’s very sad to watch Elsa go from loving her powers as a young child to being terrified of them as she gets older, refusing to let anyone in to help her.

Another part of what makes Frozen so great is the way it completely subverts the traditional Disney princess story. Anna, at the start of the film, is in so many ways the traditional princess we’ve grown up with: she believes in love at first sight, she’s perpetually optimistic, and she’s incredibly naive. Enter Prince Hans and after Elsa is crowned queen we have the typical courting/romantic song between Hans and Anna that quickly leads to a marriage proposal (that Anna immediately accepts). It feels perfect…until Elsa actually reminds her sister that “you can’t marry someone you just met.” It feels like a slap in the face but Elsa is absolutely right. That’s been the critical flaw in the classic Disney films (and even in the Disney Renaissance; think about how long Ariel knew Eric, or how long Belle actually stayed with the Beast). And I love that Disney finally put this out there in one of their films, the truth that real love doesn’t work that way!

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Another interesting part of Frozen is how Elsa is unintentionally setting herself up as the villain (at first). For example, when her ice powers are revealed at the party after the coronation, everyone’s reacting as if she’s doing it on purpose. People are screaming and running as if Elsa is trying to hurt people but she’s not. We can see that she’s actually just scared and acting on instinct. And speaking of villains, I love how transparent the Duke of Weselton (“Weaseltown”) is about wanting to take over and/or exploit Arendelle. It’s perfect for keeping us distracted from the true villain of the film…Hans!! Seriously, the revelation that Hans has been using Anna all this time is one of the best villain reveals that Disney has ever done. It genuinely made me gasp because I did not see it coming.

Now that I’ve finally seen Frozen, I’m very excited to see Frozen 2 later this year. I’m still hoping that we’ll get an explanation as to where Elsa’s ice powers come from, since the film’s only explanation is that Elsa was born with them. But there has to be more to it than that, ice powers don’t just arrive out of the blue.

Frozen is definitely one of the best Disney films to be released in the past decade and I’m glad I finally watched it. Let me know what you think about Frozen in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Animated Film Reviews

Frozen “Let it Go” (2013)

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My Thoughts on: Alita: Battle Angel (2019)

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*note: spoilers for Alita: Battle Angel can be found below

After being forced to delay my trip to the movie theater for a week (blame my sinuses), I finally got to see Alita: Battle Angel last night and all I can say is wow! This might be the best Western adaptation of a manga I’ve ever seen. For those not in the know, this film is based on Yukito Kishiro’s manga series Gunnm (better known to Western audiences as Battle Angel Alita). The film was in development for close to 20 years (it was originally announced in 2003) and while the film isn’t perfect, honestly I feel like it was worth the long wait. Alita: Battle Angel is directed by Robert Rodriguez and produced by James Cameron.

First, an overview. Alita: Battle Angel is set in the year 2563, 300 years after a devastating war known only as “the Fall.” Alita (Rosa Salazar) is salvaged from a junk pile by Dr. Ido (Christoph Waltz who for once isn’t playing a villain) and awakens with no memory of who she used to be. The story is set in Iron City, a cyberpunk metropolis located directly underneath Zalem, a floating sky city. Under Ido’s watchful (and protective) eye, Alita sets out to discover who or what she used to be. Along the way, she discovers the insane sport of Motorball (imagine roller derby, NASCAR racing, and pro wrestling combined into a single sport where you fight to the death) and falls in love with a human named Hugo (Keean Johnson) who in turn is entangled with the dangerous Vector (Mahershala Ali).

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While this film is incredibly beautiful, it is, as I said, flawed. The biggest problem is the story makes a hundred times more sense IF you read the manga first (or at least the first two volumes). While the broad strokes of the film are largely faithful to the original story, there are a myriad of background details that you’ll miss or otherwise not understand without the manga’s explanations. To be fair though, I feel like Alita: Battle Angel tries very hard to explain as much as it can without being too exposition heavy. Another issue I noticed right away is how the story begins. The discovery of Alita and her reawakening literally takes place in the first five minutes of the film. This is more of a personal preference on my part, but I feel like the film should have started with some of the flashback material we get throughout the film playing at the beginning instead as a sort of prologue.

And speaking of the flashbacks…I loved watching them, but they almost create more questions than answers. This is largely due to the fact that Alita: Battle Angel is blatantly setting up for a sequel that we may or may not get. I’m not against sequel hooks per se (Battle Angel Alita is hardly the kind of story you can tell in one film) but to leave several story threads hanging in the hopes that a sequel will finish the job…that I have a problem with. This leads to the biggest problem in the film: Nova (Edward Norton in a non-speaking role). While the film implies that Nova is the “big villain” of the story, we learn next to nothing about him (aside from the fact that he’s apparently immortal). This is very frustrating especially if a sequel never comes.

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Aside from these problems, the film really blew me away at times (in a good way). The setting of Iron City and Zalem looks like it came straight out of the manga. While I do agree that Alita’s over-large “anime eyes” look a little peculiar, for me I was able to adjust to them fairly quickly. I also love the motion capture that was used to bring Alita to life, she looks very real (no sense of the uncanny valley at all). I was also pleasantly surprised to not be bothered by the romantic sub-plot between Alita and Hugo, which comes across as incredibly sweet (if somewhat rushed). I did roll my eyes a little when the film included a stereotypical kiss in the rain, but it felt like a good kind of cheesy at the same time.

If you’re on the fence about seeing this film, I highly recommend checking it out. Despite the flaws, it IS a good story and one that deserves to be continued. Let me know what you think about Alita: Battle Angel in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Film/TV Reviews

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Justin Hurwitz talks La La Land (2016)

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While Justin Hurwitz (whose recent works include First Man) does talk about the scory of La La Land, this is less of a one-on-one interview and more of a group discussion where cast (like Ryan Gosling), crew, directors and etc. talk about the qualities of the La La Land score.

As stated in the video, the music for La La Land does call back to an earlier time in Hollywood when film music focused on melody most or all of the time. That’s not to say that today’s film scores don’t have melody, but it’s not nearly to the same extent (and many action scores don’t feature proper melody at all).

 

Seeing the depth of music in La La Land‘s score really drives home just how talented Justin Hurwitz is (I can see now why the film took home the Oscar for Best Original score).

I hope you enjoy this behind the scenes look at the score for La La Land. Let me know what you think of the score in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Film Composer Interviews A-H

Film Composer Interviews K-Z

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Reviewing Looney Tunes: Ali Baba Bunny (1957)

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Released: February 9th, 1957

Directed by: Chuck Jones

Of the many achievements Chuck Jones accomplished during his lengthy career, one of them was raising the pairing of Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck into a comedic art form that has yet to be truly matched in animation. Ali Baba Bunny is a famous example of this pairing and one of my many personal favorite cartoons.

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In Ali Baba Bunny, Bugs and Daffy are en route to Pismo Beach (California) and somehow end up tunneling through the Arabian desert, where a wealthy sultan has just finished sealing his treasure inside a magic cave. Having set the burly Hassan to guard the treasure (“Or the jackal shall grow fat on thy carcass!”) the sultan departs, shortly before Bugs and Daffy unwittingly break into the cave by tunneling under the entrance. This cartoon features Daffy during his “greedy beyond all reason” phase and it is used to great comedic effect. For example, when the pair emerge from the burrow and realize this is NOT Pismo Beach, Daffy is almost instantly mesmerized by the giant pile of treasure in front of him, while Bugs is completely oblivious. This leads to one of my favorite Daffy Duck lines:

Daffy: It’s mine you understand? Mine, mine, ALL MINE! Get back in there! Down! Down! Down! Go! Go! Go! Mine! Mine! Mine! Mwahahahahahahaha!! *zooms off to the treasure*

Bugs (still oblivious): Ehhhhh, what’s up Duck?

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Only Bugs would be oblivious to all THIS

Of course there is the small matter of Hassan who is quite angry that someone is trying to take his master’s treasure. Despite Bugs’ best efforts to keep Daffy out of trouble (which include masquerading as a genie who “gives” Hassan the treasure for HIS own), Daffy keeps getting on the guard’s bad side, especially when he makes a run for it with a giant diamond! This leads Bugs to finally corner Daffy and demand to know (“What is it with you anyway?” to which Daffy replies “I can’t help it, I’m a greedy slob, it’s my hobby.”) This is probably one of the most honest answers Daffy has ever given regarding his greed (a fit of honesty likely brought on by the fact that Hassan wants to chop him to pieces).

I also love this cartoon because it has one of the greatest twist endings ever seen in a cartoon: Daffy appears to have it made. Hassan is gone, the treasure is loaded up ready to go, when the greedy duck finds a mysterious lamp in the back of the cave. For some reason, when a genie appears (and even calls Daffy “Master”!!) The duck explodes with rage and accuses the genie of wanting his treasure. This is why I say Daffy is greedy beyond all reason, because wouldn’t you think the duck would be happy to have a magic genie at his disposal? I suppose not, and boy does the duck pay for it!

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“I’m rich! I’m a happy miser!”

Ali Baba Bunny, as I’ve said before, is one of my favorite Chuck Jones cartoons, and I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about it. Let me know what you think about this cartoon in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Reviewing Looney Tunes

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Reviewing Looney Tunes: Broom-Stick Bunny (1956)

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Released February 25th, 1956

Directed by: Chuck Jones

Broom-Stick Bunny has long been one of my favorite Looney Tunes cartoons, as it features the debut of June Foray in the role of Witch Hazel (Bea Benaderet performed the voice in Hazel’s first appearance in Bewitched Bunny). This is actually Foray’s second time playing a character by this name (with this voice no less) as she originated the character in the 1952 Donald Duck cartoon Trick or Treat (and in truth she was initially reluctant when Chuck Jones invited her to play his version of Witch Hazel, but she eventually came around to the idea).

In this cartoon, it’s Halloween night and Bugs Bunny is out trick-or-treating disguised as a witch (complete with a green mask). Meanwhile, Witch Hazel is brewing up a potion while frequently consulting her magic mirror to make sure she’s still the “ugliest of them all” as she’s terribly afraid of getting pretty as she gets older. One of my favorite running gags in this cartoon is Witch Hazel’s obsession with ugliness and talking about beauty in opposite terms (examples include: “Who undoes your hair?” “I’m going to worm all your ugly secrets out of you” and my personal favorite “LIKE it? Why it’s practically HIDEOUS!!”)

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The story starts as a comedy of errors when Bugs Bunny appears at Witch Hazel’s door and the befuddled witch thinks the rabbit is a REAL witch (leading to my other favorite line: “Witch? I don’t remember seeing HER at any of the union meetings.”) but it quickly turns serious when Hazel realizes that not only is Bugs a rabbit, but he’s also the last ingredient needed to complete her potion, leading to a wild chase throughout the house.

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In the end, of course, Bugs gets the upper hand and we’re treated to seeing what a pretty Witch Hazel looks like (fun fact: according June Foray’s commentary, the animators modeled the pretty Hazel on her actual appearance, particularly in the hairstyle as it was one she liked to wear at the time). It’s so funny to hear the now-pretty witch say in the sweetest sounding voice “Magic mirror on the wall, who’s the ugliest one of all?” The gag is heightened when the genie in the magic mirror gives chase on a flying carpet and the pair go flying off into the night.

Of all the Witch Hazel cartoons, Broom-Stick Bunny remains my favorite, and I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about it. Let me know your thoughts about this cartoon in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Reviewing Looney Tunes

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Film Music Central turns 3!

Okay technically the anniversary was two days ago but since I was laid up with a bad cold (stupid virus), I haven’t been able to celebrate until now.

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Wow, can you believe Film Music Central is THREE years old? When I started this blog, I never dreamed that it would grow as big as it has (in fact I had a crippling fear that no one would be interested in anything I had to say). Several milestones have been hit this year: we’re past 500 followers (and are actually 9 away from 600); I passed 7K monthly views for the first time and I’ve also gotten more views this year than the last two years combined. It’s definitely safe to say that 2018 has been the best year yet for Film Music Central and I’m very excited to see where things go in 2019.

I just want to thank everyone who’s helped to support my blog. Your encouragement, your comments have done a lot to keep me going in this endeavor. I know I haven’t really blogged much in the last couple weeks, but I’m hoping to return after the Thanksgiving holiday.

Once more, thank you everyone for supporting Film Music Central and here’s to another year of blogging! Cheers!

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