Pinocchio “Hi Diddle Dee Dee (reprise)” (1940)

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what-do-you-see

Having been rescued from Stromboli with the timely assistance of the Blue Fairy (who also warned that this was the last time she could directly help), Pinocchio is heading straight for home, determined to be a good boy and go to school. Jiminy Cricket is very happy too, as this time Pinocchio seems to thoroughly mean what he says. Unfortunately, who does the young puppet run into on the way home but Honest John and Gideon (again!! Honestly those two seem to be everywhere don’t they?) Having received orders from the Coachman to round up every naughty boy they can find (as detailed in the beginning of my Disturbing Disney series), the wily con men see Pinocchio as the perfect target.

Stopping Pinocchio, Honest John insists that the puppet looks deathly ill and that he simply must have an examination (so apparently Honest John is a doctor too, amazing for a talking fox who can’t read).

Pinocchio “Examination and Hi Diddle Dee Dee (reprise)” (1940)

While Gideon literally scribbles down a “report,” Honest John gives Pinocchio a thorough “examination” including this “diagnosis” of his heart:

“Now that heart. Ooh, my goodness! A palpitating syncopation of the killer diller with the wicky wacky stomping of the floy joy.”

i-m-giving-you-my-ticket

Honest John solemnly pronounces the results: “My boy…you are allergic.” It’s hysterical how he pronounces the word like it’s the most terrible disease in the world, when that’s not even close to how it works (as we all know, you’re allergic to something, it’s not just a case of being “allergic.”) Of course Pinocchio has no way of knowing that, but even so, when Honest John pronounces that the only cure is a holiday on Pleasure Island, the puppet weakly insists that he can’t go. But that’s no problem as Honest John gives Pinocchio his very own “ticket” (the Ace of Spades, otherwise known as the Death card) and lead the puppet away with a stirring reprise of “Hi Diddle Dee Dee” :

Hi Diddle Dee Dee, it’s Pleasure Isle for me!

Where every day is a holiday, and kids have nothing to do but play

Hi Diddle Dee Doo, if what I hear is true,

At noon each day there’s a big parade, the river’s flowing with lemonade,

A land of pudding and marmalade, it’s Pleasure Isle for me!

Jiminy Cricket (who had walked on ahead), realizes that Pinocchio is going the wrong way (again) and chases after the group as they lead Pinocchio to the carriage that will be departing at midnight for Pleasure Island!

And that’s the reprise of “Hi Diddle Dee Dee!” Let me know what you thought about it in the comments below!

 

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See also:

Pinocchio “Hi Diddle Dee Dee (An Actor’s Life for Me!)” (1940)

Pinocchio “I’ve Got No Strings” (1940)

For more the more disturbing aspects of Pinocchio, see also:

Disturbing Disney #1: The Coachman in Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #2: The truth of Pleasure Island in Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #3: Escaping Monstro from Pinocchio (1940)

 

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2 thoughts on “Pinocchio “Hi Diddle Dee Dee (reprise)” (1940)

  1. Pingback: Pinocchio “I’ve Got No Strings” (1940) | Film Music Central

  2. Pingback: Pinocchio “Hi Diddle Dee Dee (An Actor’s Life for Me!)” (1940) | Film Music Central

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