Tag Archives: Cinderella

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

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Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

After having her dress destroyed, poor Cinderella has finally reached her breaking point and just when she is on the verge of giving up, *POOF* here is her Fairy Godmother! And with the power of magic, Cinderella will be able to go to the ball after all! The Fairy Godmother was voiced by Verna Felton, who played a number of roles in Disney films during her career, including the Queen of Hearts, Aunt Sarah (in Lady and the Tramp), Flora in Sleeping Beauty, and Winifred the elephant in The Jungle Book (a posthumous role as she passed away before the film was released).

Listening to this song brings back all the good memories of childhood. The melody practically bounces from one note to the next, this is because the primary melody is a string of triplets (groups of three notes, see the number three under or above each group, that signifies a triplet.) Also, it’s really fun to try and say the nonsense words! During the song, some of Cinderella’s mice friends become horses, while her dog and horse become a coachman and a footman.

Salago-doola
Menchicka boola
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo
Put ’em together
And what have you got?
Bibbidi-bobbidi-Boo

Salago-doola
Menchicka boola
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo
It’ll do magic
Believe it or not
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo

Now salago-doola means
Menchicka boole-roo
But the thingmabob
That does the job
Is bibbidi-bobbidi-boo

Oh…

Salago-doola
Menchicka boola
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo
Put ’em together
And what have you got?
Bibbidi-bobbidi…
Bibbidi-bobbidi…
Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo

While all of this looks lovely, there’s still the matter of Cinderella’s dress, which the Fairy Godmother almost forgets. Allegedly, Walt Disney’s favorite piece of animation is the moment Cinderella receives her ball gown (which was always one of my favorites as well). Of course, with any bit of magic, there is always a catch: the spell that created her carriage, her dress and everything else, will break at the last stroke of midnight “and all will be as it was before.” Essentially, the Fairy Godmother is giving Cinderella her one chance to make her dreams come true, so she needs to make the most of it. That being said, I always wondered why Cinderella had to leave before the spell broke, surely if the Prince really loved her she could tell him the truth (I’m probably missing the point, I know).

As I’ve gotten older, I can’t help but notice the irony in this situation. If Lady Tremaine had let Cinderella come to the ball in her homemade dress, it’s possible the Prince would’ve never noticed her in the first place. But because she had to be spiteful, Cinderella receives a magical gown that guarantees she will be noticed.

Let me know what you think about “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

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Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

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Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

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Cinderella “The Work Song” (1950)

The message Cinderella gets at the end of “Sing Sweet Nightingale” is the one announcing a royal ball where “every eligible maiden is to attend” so that the Prince may select a bride. This does include Cinderella and Lady Tremaine knows that perfectly well. However, as she herself says, “IF Cinderella can finish all the chores, get her sisters ready AND have a suitable dress to wear, THEN she may indeed come with them.” The key word in that entire sentence, is IF (as a kid it took me years to understand that Lady Tremaine never intended for Cinderella to come with them at all).

The mice and birds, hearing the stepsisters and Lady Tremaine keeping Cinderella busy by running all over the house, are furious and decide to work on her mother’s dress so that she can go to the ball in spite of her stepfamily. This leads to “The Work Song.” I personally love this song, especially the opening part where Jaq is imitating the nagging voices of the family.

“Poor Cinderelly. Every time she find a minute, that’s the time that they begin it! Cinderelly! Cinderelly!”
“CINDERELLLLLLA!!!” (Jaq kicks the door shut in disgust)

Cinderelly Cinderelly
Night and day it’s Cinderelly
Make the fire!
Fix the breakfast!
Wash the dishes!
Do the mopping!
And the sweeping and the dusting!
They always keep her hopping!
She go around in circles till she very, very dizzy
Still they holler…
keep-a busy Cinderelly!

“Yeah, keep-a busy. You know what? Cinderelly’s not goin to the ball.”
“What?”
“Not goin?”
“What did you say?”
“You see. They fix her. Work, work, work. She’ll never get her dress done.”
“P-P-P-Poor Cinderelly.”

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“Hey! We can do it!”
We can do it, we can do it,
We can help-a Cinderelly
We can make a dress so pretty
There’s nothing to it really.
We’ll tie a sash around it
Pull a ribbon through it
When dancing at the ball
She’ll be more beautiful than all
In the lovely dress we’ll make for Cinderelly

Hurry, hurry, hurry, hurry
Gotta help-a Cinderelly
Got no time to dilly dally
We gotta get-a going

I’ll cut it with these scissors
And I can do the sewing
Leave the sewing to the women
You go get some trimming
And we’ll make a lovely dress for Cinderelly
Yes, we’ll make a lovely dress for Cinderelly!

Of course, to finish the dress on time, the mice end up…borrowing…a few things that Anastasia and Drizella threw away (particularly a necklace and a sash (the ribbon that ties around the waist). You can’t blame the mice for taking them since the two sisters clearly don’t want these items (deriding them as “worthless” and “trash.”) However, you also have to know that incorporating some of her stepsister’s belongings into the dress practically guarantees that this isn’t going to end well for Cinderella (even though she knows nothing about it). Despite knowing the fate of this dress, it’s still fun to watch the mice and birds come together to make a nice dress for Cinderella.

Let me know what you think about “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

 

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Evolution of Disney: Cinderella Part 1

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Anastasia and Drizella are taking music lessons from their mother and we are “treated” to the sound of Drizella’s…..talents….followed in contrast by Cinderella’s take on the same melody. This song is special because in it, Walt Disney pioneered the use of double tracked vocals (years before the Beatles did the same thing). A double tracked vocal is when you record an artist singing a song, then record it again and have the artist sing in harmony with the first recording. Ilene Woods did this at least four times, to create a four part harmony with her own voice, and the results are spectacular.

Oh, sing sweet nightingale
Sing sweet nightingale
High above me
Oh, sing sweet nightingale
Sing sweet nightingale

High above
Oh, sing sweet nightingale
Sing sweet nightingale, high
Oh, sing sweet nightingale
Sing sweet nightingale
Oh, sing sweet nightingale
Sing sweet
Oh, sing sweet nightingale, sing
Oh, sing sweet nightingale
Oh, sing sweet
Oh, sing

One of my favorite animations in Cinderella comes when all the different “bubble Cinderellas” sing together. This song also highlights Cinderella’s beautiful singing voice (in comparison to the Drizella’s singing voice and Anastasia’s questionable ability on the flute). You know I think this scene is further proof that Lady Tremaine is completely blind to the realities of her daughters. Anyone with half an ear can see that these two have no musical talent whatsoever, but does Lady Tremaine chastise them for being off-key? Nope!

Like most of the scenes in Cinderella, this scene was also filmed in live action before it was animated and I love looking at the picture of the actresses playing Drizella and Anastasia because it’s almost exactly like the final animated version.

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Let me know what you think about “Sing Sweet Nightingale” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

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Cinderella “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” (1950)

A lot has happened since Walt Disney released Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to worldwide acclaim. World War II has come and gone, along with a string of several flops at the box office. Heavily in debt, Disney agreed to produce another animated feature film, this time using the classic fairy tale Cendrillon by Charles Perrault as the inspiration. Begun in 1948 and released in 1950, Cinderella was hailed as the greatest animated film since Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and is widely considered to be one of the greatest animated films ever made. The future princess was voiced by singer Ilene Woods. She had become friends with songwriters Mack David and Jerry Livingston, and one day they called her over to record demo tracks for three songs: “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo,” “A Dream is A Wish Your Heart Makes,” and “So This Is Love.” When Disney heard the recordings, he hired Woods immediately to voice Cinderella, choosing her over 300 other girls who had auditioned.

Like Snow White before her, Cinderella is living life under the whim of her brutal stepmother Lady Tremaine and her mean stepsisters, Anastasia and Drizella. They also have a devious black cat named Lucifer, who is always trying to catch the mice and birds that are Cinderella’s friends and helpers. While her stepfamily enjoys a luxurious life, Cinderella is forced to do all the chores in her own home. It’s during this time that she rescues a new mouse from Lucifer and names him Gus.

Cinderella sings at the start of another day about how important dreams are, that “dreams are wishes your heart makes.” This is how Cinderella goes through life. Compare the opening of this song to any song that Snow White sings and you’ll see the difference. Whereas Snow White was a high soprano (Adriana Caselotti was an opera singer later in life), Cinderella’s vocal range is closer to that of a contralto (lower than a soprano, but still with a fairly wide range of notes). Keep in mind that over a decade has passed since Snow White was released, and musical styles have changed greatly since then.

A dream is a wish your heart makes
When you’re fast asleep
In dreams you will lose your heartaches
Whatever you wish for, you keep
Have faith in your dreams and someday
Your rainbow will come smiling through
No matter how your heart is grieving
If you keep on believing
The dream that you wish will come true

(Speaking)
Oh, that clock!
Old killjoy.
I hear you! “Come on, get up,” you say!
“Time to start another day!”
Even he orders me around.
Well, there’s one thing.
They can’t order me to stop dreaming.
And perhaps someday…

(Singing)
The dreams that I wish
Will come true

La-da-da-da-da-da-da-da
La-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da
Hmm-hmm-hmm-hmm-hmmm-hmm-hmm-hmm
La-da-la-da-da-da-da-da-dee
Hmm-mm-hm-mm-mm-hmm-hmm-hmm
La-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-dee
La-da-da-da-daaa-da-da-da
Hmm-hmm-hmm-hm-hmm-hmm-hm-hmm

No matter how your heart is grieving
If you keep on believing
The Dream that you wish
Will come true

This song does a good job in establishing what Cinderella is like, she’s the eternal optimist (she has to be, given the circumstances). Let me know what you think about “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Cinderella “Sing Sweet Nightingale” (1950)

Cinderella “The Work Song/Cinderelly, Cinderelly” (1950)

Cinderella “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” (1950)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

 

Disturbing Disney #19: Cinderella’s dress is destroyed (1950)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

There’s no denying that Cinderella goes through some pretty awful things before her happily ever after. Her father dies; she’s treated like a servant in her own home; Lady Tremaine (her stepmother) seems determined to make sure that Cinderella gets nothing while Anastasia and Drizella (her daughters) get everything. Knowing all of this, it’s surprising when, after receiving the invitation to the royal ball, Lady Tremaine agrees that Cinderella can go, provided she has a suitable dress of course. Even as a child I knew that something horrible was coming, but it never stopped me from being shocked and upset at what happens to poor Cinderella.

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Cinderella “Dress tearing scene” (1950)

As I’ve related earlier, while Cinderella is worked ragged getting her stepsisters ready for the ball, her mice and bird friends work together to brighten up a dress that belonged to Cinderella’s mother. This involves using a sash and necklace that Anastasia and Drizella threw away (but keep in mind Cinderella doesn’t know this). Finally, as the others are leaving for the ball, Cinderella races down the stairs to join them, much to their surprise.

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Lady Tremaine is nothing but a woman of her word…but she can’t help pointing out a few of the details on the dress, such as the necklace (which you know she recognized as her daughter’s) saying “These beads, they make just the right touch. Don’t you think so Drizella?”

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These words serve as the trigger for the disturbing portion of this scene and I must say for a long time I wasn’t able to watch this part of the film at all. Having gone through a lot of bullying as a child and teenager, seeing Cinderella basically get attacked by her stepsisters brought back a lot of painful memories, as I’m sure it does for a lot of people watching this scene. But getting back to the scene…Drizella is halfway through an insult when she realizes the necklace belonged to her, prompting her to call Cinderella a thief and rip the necklace away. Of course Cinderella doesn’t understand why Drizella is upset, she had no idea the necklace belonged to her. And upon further inspection, Anastasia realizes the sash belonged to her so she rips it away and everything devolves into a frenzy, with the two sisters ripping Cinderella’s dress apart while Lady Tremaine just watches with a smug look on her face. It’s hard to tell what Drizella and Anastasia are saying, but one line has always jumped out at me: just before Lady Tremaine stops the torment, Drizella gets right in Cinderella’s face and yells “You ungrateful little-”

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Ungrateful?? This is one of the most delusional lines I’ve ever heard. Cinderella waits on her stepsisters hand and foot and just because she wants to attend the ball in a homemade dress, that makes her ungrateful? Not to mention they’re only living in this beautiful mansion because Lady Tremaine married Cinderella’s father, I suspect the house belongs to Cinderella by right. This is just abuse, plain and simple.

What bugs me also is why Lady Tremaine lets them do this. She could have very easily just told Cinderella “No, you’re not going, I lied” and then left. No, she clearly wants Cinderella to suffer as well for no reason, which really puts her up there with the worst of the Disney villains.

In the end, of course, the dress, her mother’s dress, probably one of the few things of her mother Cinderella has left, is in ruins. Satisfied that her stepdaughter won’t be going anywhere, Lady Tremaine ushers her daughters out and smugly wishes Cinderella “good night.” Even though this directly leads into Cinderella meeting the Fairy Godmother and getting her beautiful gown, I can barely stand to watch this scene for the reasons previously mentioned. It puts you on an emotional roller coaster that is hard to get away from.

What do you think about the scene where Cinderella’s dress is torn apart by her stepsisters? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and have a great day!

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Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

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See also:

Disturbing Disney #1: The Coachman in Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #2: The truth of Pleasure Island in Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #3: Escaping Monstro from Pinocchio (1940)

Disturbing Disney #4: Dumbo loses his mother (1941)

Disturbing Disney #5 The death of Bambi’s Mother

Disturbing Disney #6: Faline vs. the dogs (1942)

Disturbing Disney #7: Cruella wants to do WHAT??

Disturbing Disney #8: The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met (from Make Mine Music, 1946)

Disturbing Disney #9: Dr. Facilier’s Fate (The Princess and the Frog, 2009)

Disturbing Disney #10: The rat in Lady and the Tramp (1955)

Disturbing Disney #11: Clayton’s Death in Tarzan (1999)

Disturbing Disney #12: The Bear from The Fox and the Hound (1981)

Disturbing Disney #13: “Smoking them out” in The Fox and the Hound (1981)

Disturbing Disney #14: The Salt Trap in The Jungle Book (1994)

Disturbing Disney #15: Night on Bald Mountain from Fantasia (1940)

Disturbing Disney #16: King Triton destroys Ariel’s grotto

Disturbing Disney #17: Ratigan becomes a monster in The Great Mouse Detective

Disturbing Disney #18: The Queen’s assignment for her Huntsman

Disturbing Disney #20: Quasimodo is crowned ‘King of Fools’ (1996)

Patrick Doyle Talks Cinderella (2015)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

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Patrick Doyle talks Cinderella (2015)

In 2015 Cinderella became the latest Disney animated film to undergo the live-action remake treatment and the results were….okay (depending on who you ask). The biggest change between the 1950 original and this version is that the latter is not a musical (which I think is a real shame).

Unlike Maleficent, which told the Sleeping Beauty story from the perspective of the titular character, Cinderella basically retold the story straight (with various changes here and there, but nothing too extreme). And as beautiful as it looked in the previews, I couldn’t bring myself to watch it, as I grew up watching the animated film. Also, no offense, but Cate Blanchett has NOTHING on Eleanor Audley when it comes to playing Lady Tremaine (I watched a few clips to get an idea of the film).

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One bright spot is Patrick Doyle’s score, created with an emphasis on romance. Doyle frequently collaborates with director Kenneth Branagh (including Hamlet and Thor) and the resulting music was well-received by critics. Doyle briefly mentions the score in a red carpet interview I was able to find for the film’s premiere (available in the link above). Doyle enjoyed creating the music for this film and described it as being “very eclectic.”

Cinderella-2015-Ella-and-stepsisters

Unfortunately it is a very short interview, but I hope you enjoy it (if anyone can point me to a longer interview regarding this film, I will happily add it) 🙂

I’m glad everyone is enjoying Disturbing Disney so far; I just wanted to let you know that the next installment will come next week. Right now the university is on spring break and I’m working extra hours so I don’t have a lot of time to work on that series right now (that’s why I’ve been doing smaller posts thus far).

See also:

Film Composer Interviews A-H

Film Composer Interviews K-Z


See also (for the original Cinderella):

Cinderella: Part 1 (1950)

Cinderella: Part 2 (1950)

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