Tag Archives: Disney

The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride “My Lullaby” (1998)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

lk2-7.jpg

Zira (Suzanne Pleshette) is the big villain of The Lion King II. According to the backstory, she maintained her allegiance to Scar even after his death and was subsequently banished (along with her followers) to the Outlands, a barren area just past the boundaries of the Pride Lands. After all these years, Zira is determined to have her revenge on Simba no matter what, and “My Lullaby” outlines her thoughts on the subject. The song starts off innocently enough as a lullaby to Kovu, but it quickly turns into a song about how she dreams of Simba brutally dying and these thoughts are her own personal lullaby.

Hush, my little one.
You must be exhausted.
Sleep, my little Kovu
Let your dreams take wing
One day when you’re big and strong
You will be a king

I’ve been exiled, persecuted
Left alone with no defense
When I think of what that brute did
I get a little tense
But I dream a dream so pretty
That I don’t feel so depressed
‘Cause it soothes my inner kitty
And it helps me get some rest

The sound of Simba’s dying gasp
His daughter squealing in my grasp
His lionesses’ mournful cry
That’s my lullaby

Now the past I’ve tried forgetting
And my foes I could forgive
Trouble is, I knows it’s petty
But I hate to let them live
So you found yourself somebody who’d chase Simba up a tree
Oh, the battle may be bloody, but that kind of works for me

 

So this verse has just made it clear that this conflict will not end peacefully. Zira will never “forgive and forget” or “put the past behind her” (as Simba learned to do in the first film). She will have her vengeance no matter the cost.

The melody of angry growls
A counterpoint of painful howls
A symphony of death, oh my!
That’s my lullaby

Scar is gone… but Zira’s still around
To love this little lad
Till he learns to be a killer
With a lust for being bad!

Sleep, ya little termite!
Uh– I mean, precious little thing!
One day when you’re big and strong…
You will be a king!

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

The pounding of the drums of war!
The thrill of Kovu’s mighty roar!
The joy of vengeance!
Testify!
I can hear the cheering
Kovu, what a guy!
Payback time is nearing
And then our flag will fly
Against a blood-red sky!
That’s my lullaby!

In terms of style, “My Lullaby” is very similar to “Be Prepared” from the first film. In both songs, the villain is laying out their plan to take power in the Pride Lands (the only big difference is that Zira isn’t aligned with the hyenas who are conspicuously absent in this film). You can tell from this song that this is what Zira wants more than anything, to kill Simba and Kiara, and put Kovu on the throne. Not everyone is thrilled with this plan though. Zira’s oldest son Nuka (Andy Dick) is bitterly jealous and thinks he should be the one to take power when the time comes.

Let me know what you think about “My Lullaby” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride “He Lives in You” (1998)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Advertisements

The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride “He Lives in You” (1998)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

HLIY.png

In the late 1990s and 2000s, Disney went on a spree of creating sequels to all of their animated films, most of which paled in comparison to the originals. However, there were a few successful follow-ups and The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride is one of them. The story follows Simba’s (Matthew Broderick) daughter Kiara (Neve Campbell) as she finds herself becoming friends (and later much more) with Kovu (Jason Marsden), the alleged son of Scar and Zira (a lioness who followed Scar, even after Simba returned to the Pride Lands), leader of a band of exiled lions. If the first Lion King is based on Hamlet, then the sequel is clearly Romeo and Juliet (only there’s a happy ending in this version).

 

The film starts, like the original, with a sunrise and the animals traveling again to Pride Rock to acknowledge the new heir to the throne. “He Lives in You” actually comes from the Broadway version of The Lion King and was initially sung by Mufasa to Simba (speaking of the Great Kings of the Past) and later by Rafiki. Like “The Circle of Life,” this song also mixes some Zulu into the lyrics.

Ingonyama nengw’ enamabala
Ingonyama nengw’ enamabala

Night
And the spirit of life
Calling

Oh, oh, iyo
Mamela (Listen)
Oh, oh, iyo

And a voice
With the fear of a child
Answers

Oh, oh, iyo
Oh, mamela (Listen)
Oh, oh, iyo

simbas_pride_0078

Ubukhosi bo khokho (Throne of the ancestors)
We ndodana ye sizwe sonke (Oh, son of the nation)

Wait
There’s no mountain too great
Oh, oh, iyo
Hear the words and have faith
Oh, oh, iyo
Have faith

Hela hm mamela (Hey, listen)

He lives in you (Hela hm mamela, hela)
He lives in me (Hela hm mamela, hela)
He watches over (Hela hm mamela, hela)
Everything we see (Hela hm mamela, hela)
Into the water (Hela hm mamela, hela)
Into the truth (Hela hm mamela, hela)
In your reflection (Hela hm mamela)
He lives in you

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

As Kiara is presented to the animals of the Pride Lands, we can see Mufasa’s spirit watching over the proceedings, clearly pleased with how things are going. I think it really helps that this film opens like the original story, it provides a sense of continuity, the idea that this is a real follow-up to Simba’s story. This song is also a call back to Rafiki’s message to Simba in the original film (“That’s not my father, it’s just my reflection.” “You see…he lives in you.”)

What do you think about “He Lives in You?” Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Dumbo “Pink Elephants on Parade” (1941)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

dumbo-pink-elephants-1108x0-c-default.jpg

“Pink Elephants on Parade” might possibly be one of the most psychedelic and mind-twisting pieces of animation that early Disney ever produced. The song comes after Dumbo has been forced to become a circus clown and is still deeply depressed over being separated from his mother. The well-meaning Timothy Q. Mouse takes Dumbo to get a drink of water to help him feel better, not realizing that a bottle of champagne has been added to the watering trough. As a result, both Dumbo and Timothy quickly become intoxicated (remember, this is 1941, different time, different standards) and begin seeing things, particularly strange pink elephants that quickly take over the screen. The song “Pink Elephants On Parade” comments on how unnatural it is to see pink elephants and what a disturbing sight it is. The song’s purpose is to 1) lighten the mood after all of the terrible things that have happened to Dumbo and 2) transition the story to the eventual discovery that Dumbo can fly.

Look out! Look out!
Pink elephants on parade.
Here they come!
Hippety hoppety.

They’re here, and there.
Pink elephants ev’rywhere!

Look out! Look out!
They’re walking around the bed.
On their head!
Clippety cloppety.

Arrayed in braid.
Pink elephants on parade!

What’ll I do? What’ll I do?
What an unusual view!

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

I could stand the sight of worms
And look at microscopic germs
But technicolor pachyderms
Is really too much for me!

I am not the type to faint
When things are odd or things
are quaint
But seeing things you know that ain’t
Can certainly give you an awful fright!
What a sight!

Chase ’em away!
Chase ’em away!
I’m afraid need your aid
Pink elephants on parade!

Hey hey hey

Pink elephants!
Pink elephants!
Pink elephants….

Once the elephants take over, Dumbo and Timothy disappear from the song and are not seen again until the elephants fade away. Until then, the screen is full of multi-colored elephants twisting and turning into different shapes. I know some people have commented on finding this scene scary or even a little disturbing, but I don’t personally remember being scared, if anything I thought it was funny. That being said, the song does contain some very surreal animation; for example a snake becomes an elephant dancer, which transforms into a ball, which becomes a floating eye (definitely not something you see every day). Also, if some of the footage looks familiar, it’s because part of it was recycled for “Heffalumps and Woozles” from Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day (1968).

Let me know what you think about “Pink Elephants on Parade” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Dumbo “Look Out For Mr. Stork” (1941)

Dumbo “Song of the Roustabouts” (1941)

Dumbo “When I See an Elephant Fly” (1941)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Dumbo “Look Out For Mr. Stork” (1941)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

hqdefault.jpg

The original Dumbo film was released in 1941 and followed the adventures of the titular baby elephant, who for some reason was born with enormous ears. The story begins the night before the circus is due to leave for the next town, but before the train leaves the storks arrive to deliver a plethora of babies to all of the circus animals. This is the scene for “Look Out For Mr. Stork.” The premise of this song is that the stork delivers babies to everyone, rich or poor, whether you want it or not (that’s actually a little disturbing if you think about it, imagine if these baby animals were sent to parents that didn’t want them!)

Look out for Mr. Stork
That persevering chap
He’ll come along and drop
A bundle in your lap
You may be poor or rich
It doesn’t matter which
Millionaires, they get theirs
Like the butcher and the baker
So look out for Mr. Stork
And let me tell you, friend
Don’t try to get away
He’ll find you in the end
He’ll spot you out in China or he’ll fly to County Cork
So you better look out for Mr. Stork

Look out for Mr. Stork
He’s got you on his list
And when he comes around
It’s useless to resist
Remember those quintuplets and the woman in the shoe
Maybe he’s got his eye on you

Well, almost all of the circus animals receive babies. While newborn babies are sent to their parents left and right, Mrs. Jumbo, one of the elephants, doesn’t receive a baby that she is clearly expecting (not to worry, he arrives the next morning, that particular stork was running late). However, knowing in hindsight that Mrs. Jumbo will get her baby doesn’t change the fact that seeing her be disappointed again and again is very heartbreaking to watch. This is yet another example of how good early Disney was with incorporating some really sad material into their animated films.

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

Despite the sadness of Mrs. Jumbo, it is fun to watch all the baby animals arrive. One of my favorite moments is when the litter of tiger cubs come crawling out and wake up their mother. Though, as a child, part of me always wondered what the circus staff would make of all the babies the next day.

Let me know what you think about “Look Out For Mr. Stork” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Dumbo “Song of the Roustabouts” (1941)

Dumbo “Pink Elephants on Parade” (1941)

Dumbo “When I See an Elephant Fly” (1941)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Brother Bear “Great Spirits” (2003)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

Great_Spirits.png

Brother Bear is another example of a Disney animated film that has slowly but surely been forgotten. The 44th animated feature produced by Disney, Brother Bear was one of the last traditionally animated films produced by the company until The Princess and the Frog (2009), as the company was transitioning to computer animated features during this time. Like Tarzan (1999), Brother Bear features a Phil Collins musical soundtrack.

Set at the end of the last Ice Age, Brother Bear follows three Inuit brothers, Sitka, Denahi, and Kenai as they go about their lives in their village. The film particularly focuses on Kenai, who is receiving his totem that he must fulfill in order to become a man. While Sitka receives the eagle of guidance, and Denahi the wolf of wisdom, Kenai receives the bear of love (much to his embarrassment) and ends up going on a long journey to learn the meaning of his totem.

The story begins with “Great Spirits,”  a song that feels very similar to “Steady As the Beating Drum” in Pocahontas. The lyrics, like many Disney songs, contain the lesson that Kenai will have to learn, that “we are all the same, brothers to each other.”

When the earth was young
And the air was sweet
And the mountains kissed the sky
In the far beyond, with its many paths
Man and nature lived side by side

In this wilderness of danger and beauty
Lived three brothers, bonded by love
Their hearts full of joy
They ask now for guidance
Reaching out to the skies up above

Great Spirits of all who lived before
Take our hands and lead us
Fill our hearts and souls with all you know
Show us that in your eyes
We are all the same
Brothers to each other
In this world we remain truly brothers all the same

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

Give us wisdom to pass to each other
Give us strength so we understand
That the things we do
The choices we make
Give direction to all life’s plan

To look in wonder at all we’ve been given
In a world that’s not always as it seems
Every corner we turn
Only leads to another
A journey ends
But another begins

Great Spirits of all who lived before
Take our hands and lead us
Fill our hearts and souls with all you know
Show us that in your eyes
We are all the same
Brothers to each other
In this world we remain truly brothers all the same

The post-Ice Age world is beautifully animated, with gorgeous landscapes and subtle reminders that this isn’t quite the world we’re familiar with (views of the receding glaciers, Kenai riding a mammoth). It’s a shame this film doesn’t get more attention because it really is beautiful and “Great Spirits” is a wonderful song.

Let me know what you think about “Great Spirits” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Bambi “Looking For Romance” (1942)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

Bambi_366

When last we saw Bambi and company, the young Prince had just won a hard-fought battle so he could claim Faline as his mate. Now that they’re together, it’s time for the obligatory Disney love song between the new couple. I owe Disney a great apology regarding this song. When I was younger, I was bored STIFF by this section because we’d just had this awesome fight and now we have this “mushy stuff” that seems to go on forever and ever before the story gets good again. But now that I’m much, much older, I can appreciate the animation and the song itself. “Looking for Romance” is ostensibly sung by Bambi and Faline as they run through the meadow at night together, and travel through other parts of the forest. In reality, the song is performed by Donald Novis and the Disney Chorus.

I bring you a song
And I sing as I go
For I want you to know
That I’m looking for romance

I bring you a song
In the hope that you’ll see
When you’re looking at me
That I’m looking for love

I’m seeking that glow
Only found when you’re young and it’s May
Only found on that wonderful day
When all longing is through

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

I’m seeking that glow
Only found when a thrill is complete
Only found when two hearts gently beat
To the strains of a waltz that’s both tender and new

I bring you a song
For I’m seeking romance
You’re by my side

There’s a moon up above
It shines with a light that’s so mellow and bright
It’s easy to see that tonight we shall fall in love

I bring you a song
For I’m seeking romance
And you

Watching this scene, it’s beautiful how the animators were able to realize moonlight so convincingly. One of my favorite moments (apart from the music) is when you see two birds go flying through the night, with the moonlight causing them to glow. It’s a gorgeous moment and the last real slow moment of the film because things are about to get very dangerous once again for Bambi and all his friends.

Let me know what you think about “Looking For Romance” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Bambi “Love is a Song” (1942)

Bambi “Little April Shower” (1942)

Bambi “Let’s Sing a Gay Little Spring Song” (1942)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook

Bambi “Love is a Song” (1942)

*the links in this post contain affiliate links and I will receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on my link.

BDE_ks01

On August 13th, 1942, RKO Radio Pictures released Walt Disney’s fifth animated classic Bambi, based on the 1923 novel  Bambi, a Life in the Woods, by Felix Salten. Disney actually acquired the rights to Bambi in 1937, after MGM’s attempts to turn the book into a live-action film proved to be unfeasible. Originally meant to be Disney’s second animated feature, the project became delayed (among other things, the animators discovered that animating deer realistically was no easy task) and work didn’t really get going until 1939. The score for this film proved to be the final work of composer Frank Churchill (1901-1942), who died after committing suicide following a severe bout of depression.

The film went through many stages, but the following main characters emerged:

Bambi: the son of the Great Prince of the Forest (Fred Shields); spends the first half of the story living with his unnamed mother (Paula Winslowe). Bambi’s closest friends are Thumper, a gray rabbit, and Flower, a male skunk (the name is based on a joke where Bambi, learning to speak, mistakenly thinks that Flower is, well, a flower, much to Thumper’s amusement).

Shop Movies + Spend $35, Get Free Shipping

 

The film’s opening song (referenced again as the film closes) is “Love is a Song,” performed as the opening credits roll. The song speaks to an enduring theme in the story that love takes many forms and despite changes in life, it never really goes away.

Love is a song that never ends
Life may be swift and fleeting
Hope may die yet love’s beautiful music
Comes each day like the dawn

Love is a song that never ends
One simple theme repeating
Like the voice of a heavenly choir
Love’s sweet music flows on

Like the voice of a heavenly choir
Love’s sweet music flows on

I actually didn’t like this opening when I was younger because the themes about love went over my head (plus I wanted to get on with the story). Years later I can appreciate what “Love is a Song” is trying to say. Let me know what you think of “Love is a Song” in the comments below and have a great day!

See also:

Bambi “Little April Shower” (1942)

Bambi “Let’s Sing a Gay Little Spring Song” (1942)

Bambi “Looking For Romance” (1942)

Disney/Dreamworks/Pixar/etc. Soundtracks A-Z

Become a Patron of the blog at patreon.com/musicgamer460

Check out the YouTube channel (and consider hitting the subscribe button)

Don’t forget to like Film Music Central on Facebook